Nomenclature: CCR5

Family: Chemokine receptors

Annotation status:  image of a green circle Annotated and expert reviewed. Please contact us if you can help with updates. 

Contents

Gene and Protein Information
class A G protein-coupled receptor
Species TM AA Chromosomal Location Gene Symbol Gene Name Reference
Human 7 352 3p21 CCR5 chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (gene/pseudogene) 19,44,51,53-54
Mouse 7 354 9 Ccr5 chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 37
Rat 7 354 8q32 Ccr5 chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 31
Previous and Unofficial Names
Names References
CC CKR5
CC CK5
CHEMR13 53
CKR5
CC CK5
CC CKR5
CMKBR5
CKR-5
CC-CKR-5
CD195
IDDM22
chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5
CCR-5
C-C CKR-5
C-C chemokine receptor type 5
MIP-1 alpha receptor
chemokine (C-C) receptor 5
Database Links
ChEMBL Target
DrugBank Target
Ensembl Gene
Entrez Gene
GPCRDB
GeneCards
GenitoUrinary Development Molecular Anatomy Project
HomoloGene
Human Protein Reference Database
InterPro
KEGG Gene
OMIM
PharmGKB Gene
PhosphoSitePlus
Protein Ontology (PRO)
RefSeq Nucleotide
RefSeq Protein
TreeFam
UniGene Hs.
UniProtKB
Wikipedia
Selected 3D Structures
Image of receptor 3D structure from RCSB PDB
Description:  Crystal Structure of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor
PDB Id:  4MBS
Ligand:  maraviroc
Resolution:  2.71Å
Species:  Human
References:  59
Natural/Endogenous Ligands
CCL11 {Sp: Mouse} , CCL11 {Sp: Rat} , CCL11 {Sp: Human}
CCL14 {Sp: Human}
CCL16 {Sp: Human}
CCL2 {Sp: Mouse} , CCL2 {Sp: Human} , CCL2 {Sp: Rat}
CCL3 {Sp: Mouse} , CCL3 {Sp: Rat} , CCL3 {Sp: Human}
CCL4 {Sp: Mouse} , CCL4 {Sp: Human} , CCL4 {Sp: Rat}
CCL5 {Sp: Human} , CCL5 {Sp: Mouse, Rat}
CCL7 {Sp: Human} , CCL7 {Sp: Mouse} , CCL7 {Sp: Rat}
CCL8 {Sp: Human} , CCL8 {Sp: Mouse}
Agonists
Key to terms and symbols Click column headers to sort
Ligand Sp. Action Affinity Units Reference
[125I]CCL4 (human) Hs Full agonist 9.6 pKd 44
pKd 9.6 (Kd 2.51x10-10 M) [44]
CCL4 {Sp: Human} Hs Full agonist 9.4 – 9.6 pKi 44,52
pKi 9.4 – 9.6 [44,52]
CCL5 {Sp: Human} Hs Full agonist 9.2 – 9.7 pKi 8,44,52
pKi 9.2 – 9.7 [8,44,52]
CCL8 {Sp: Human} Hs Full agonist 9.3 pKi 52
pKi 9.3 [52]
CCL13 {Sp: Human} Hs Full agonist 9.1 pKi 52
pKi 9.1 [52]
CCL3 {Sp: Human} Hs Full agonist 8.0 – 8.9 pKi 44,52,66
pKi 8.0 – 8.9 [44,52,66]
BP-CCL3 Hs Full agonist 7.7 pKi 66
pKi 7.7 [66]
Flu-CCL3 Hs Full agonist 7.6 pKi 66
pKi 7.6 [66]
CCL2 {Sp: Human} Hs Full agonist 7.5 pKi 44
pKi 7.5 [44]
CCL14 {Sp: Human} Hs Full agonist 7.2 pKi 44
pKi 7.2 [44]
CCL11 {Sp: Human} Hs Full agonist 7.7 pIC50 15
pIC50 7.7 [15]
Antagonists
Key to terms and symbols View all chemical structures Click column headers to sort
Ligand Sp. Action Affinity Units Reference
[3H]maraviroc Hs Antagonist 9.1 pKd 44
pKd 9.1 [44]
[3H]ancriviroc Hs Antagonist 8.9 pKd 57
pKd 8.9 [57]
vicriviroc Hs Antagonist 9.1 pKi 57
pKi 9.1 [57]
aplaviroc Hs Antagonist 8.5 pKi 38
pKi 8.5 [38]
ancriviroc Hs Antagonist 7.8 – 8.7 pKi 38,49,57
pKi 7.8 – 8.7 [38,49,57]
TAK-779 Hs Antagonist 7.5 pKi 38
pKi 7.5 [38]
CCL7 {Sp: Human} Hs Antagonist 7.5 pKi 44
pKi 7.5 [44]
E913 Hs Antagonist 8.7 pIC50 39
pIC50 8.7 [39]
TAK-652 Hs Antagonist 8.6 pIC50 9
pIC50 8.6 [9]
TAK-220 Hs Antagonist 8.5 pIC50 30
pIC50 8.5 [30]
vMIP-II Hs Antagonist 8.3 pIC50 35
pIC50 8.3 [35]
maraviroc Hs Antagonist 8.1 pIC50 44
pIC50 8.1 [44]
Antagonist Comments
A number of CCR5 receptor antagonists are currently in clinical trials as blockers of HIV entry [32-33,62].
Primary Transduction Mechanisms
Transducer Effector/Response
Gi/Go family Calcium channel
References:  46
Secondary Transduction Mechanisms
Transducer Effector/Response
Gi/Go family Adenylate cyclase inhibition
References:  6
Tissue Distribution
CD4+ T lymphocytes.
Species:  Human
Technique:  Flow cytometry.
References:  34
Blood dendritic cells.
Species:  Human
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  7
Th1-type lymphocytes.
Species:  Human
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  43
Testicular macrophages.
Species:  Human
Technique:  Northern blotting and RT-PCR.
References:  26
Tonsil B lymphocytes.
Species:  Human
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  20
Testes.
Species:  Human
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  26
Blood and cerebrospinal fluid B lymphocytes.
Species:  Human
Technique:  Flow cytometry.
References:  58
Microglia.
Species:  Human
Technique:  Flow cytometry.
References:  2,21
Basophils.
Species:  Human
Technique:  RT-PCR and flow cytometry.
References:  29
Bone marrow dendritic cells.
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  Ribonuclease protection assay.
References:  45
Osteoblasts.
Species:  Rat
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  63
Hippocampal neurons.
Species:  Rat
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  41
Lung, spleen, kidney, thymus, macrophages.
Species:  Rat
Technique:  RNase protection assay.
References:  31
Expression Datasets

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Log average relative transcript abundance in mouse tissues measured by qPCR from Regard, J.B., Sato, I.T., and Coughlin, S.R. (2008). Anatomical profiling of G protein-coupled receptor expression. Cell, 135(3): 561-71. [PMID:18984166] [Raw data: website]

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Functional Assays
Detection of HIV-1 fusion in HeLa cells transfected with CD4 and the human CCR5 receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  HeLa cells expressing CD4 and CCR5.
Response measured:  HIV-1 fusion and infection.
References:  18
Measurement of cAMP levels in CHO and NG108-15 cells transfected with the human CCR5 receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  CHO and NG108-15 cells.
Response measured:  Inhibition of cAMP accumulation.
References:  64
Measurement of Ca2+ levels in CHO cells transfected with the human CCR5 receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  CHO cells.
Response measured:  Ca2+ influx.
References:  8
Measurement of chemotaxis of skin natural killer (NK) cells endogenously expressing the CCR5 receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  Skin NK lymphocytes.
Response measured:  Chemotaxis.
References:  48
Detection of cell death of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells induced to express the CCR5 receptor by lentiviral transduction.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.
Response measured:  Apoptosis by caspase-3 activation.
References:  16
Measurement of Ca2+ currents in HEK 293 cells stably expressing N-type calcium channels and the rat CCR5 receptor, using Ba2+ as the charge carrier (IBa).
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  HEK 293 cells.
Response measured:  IBa inhibition.
References:  46
Physiological Functions
HIV coreceptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  Microglia.
References:  2
Chemotaxis.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  NK lymphocytes.
References:  48
Angiogenesis.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Cornea.
References:  4
T-cell and eosinophil trafficking.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  56
Leukocyte trafficking.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  13
Physiological Consequences of Altering Gene Expression
CCR5 receptor knockout mice exhibit defective clearence of Listeria monocytogenes infection as well as having a protective effect against lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  65
CCR5 receptor knockout mice infected with Cryptococcus neoformans exhibit reduced survival compared to wild-type, defective leukocyte recruitment to the brain and defective clearence of extracellular cryptococcal polysaccharide capsules which accumulate in the brain.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  28
CCR5 receptor knockout mice exhibit decreased IFN-γ responses and defective granuloma formation.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  55
CCR5 receptor knockout mice infected with mouse hepatitis virus exhibit reduced macrophage infiltration to the CNS and subsequent decrease in demyelination.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  24
CCR5 receptor knockout mice have a reduced incidence of collagen-induced arthritis following collagen II-immunisation. They exhibit reduced IgG levels as well as increased levels of Il-10 on splenocytes and overproduction of MIP-1β.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  10
CCR5 receptor knockout mice infected with live Aspergillus fumigatus (model of chronic fungal asthma) exhibit an initial reduced airway hyperresponsiveness to cholinergic stimulation compared to wild-type mice also infected with the fungus. The knockout mice initially show reduced peribronchial T-cell and eosinophil accumulation as well as reduced goblet cell hyperplasia and peribronchial fibrosis. However, 12 days after infection both the wild-type and the knockout mice exhibit similar allergic airway disease.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  56
CCR5 receptor knockout mice exhibit reduced corneal neovascularization and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  4
Few CCR5 receptor knockout mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) develop the the characteristic neurologic signs of cerebral malaria (CM) as seen in wild-type mice infected with the parasite. The knockout mice that did not exhibit CM had defective leukocyte accumulation in the brain and reduced Th1 cytokine production.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  13
CCR5 receptor knockout mice exhibit delayed dendritic cell tumour growth following injection of melanoma cells. In addition, the knockout mice injected with tumour followed by a vaccination of matured DCs from wild-type mice lack significant tumour growth hence exhibit protective antitumor immunity.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  45
CCR5 receptor knockout mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis exhibit immune cell trafficking to the lungs and control of infection. Infact, the knockout mice exhibit increased leukocyte migration to the lungs, increased numbers of inflammatory cytokines, increased levels of dendritic cells in the lung-draining lymph nodes, an increase in the amount of primed T lymphocytes and an increase in bacterial numbers in the lymph nodes compared to wild-type mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  3
CCR5 receptor knockout mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi exhibit reduced migration of T lymphocytes to the heart and increased susceptibility to infection.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  27,36
CCR5 receptor knockout mice exhibit fewer lung metastases than wild-type mice following injection of B16-F10 melanoma cells.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  60
CCR5 receptor knockout mice are protected from dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-mediated colitis. They have increased levels of CD4+ and NK1.1+ lymphocytes in the colonic lamina propria as well as increased Il-4, Il-5 and Il-10 expression and decreased IFN-γ expression.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  5
CCR5 receptor knockout mice administered with Con A develop fulminant liver failure (FLF) by reduced apoptosis of CD1d-restricted NKT cells.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  1
CCR5 receptor knockout mice infected with Chlamydia trachomatis have an increased susceptibility to infection compared to infected wild-type mice. Infected wild-type mice had a significantly lower pregnancy rate than infected knockout mice, suggesting that the inflammatory response by the host may be involved in the development of tubal infertility.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  12
West Nile virus (WNV) infection is uniformly fatal in CCR5 knockout mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  23
Phenotypes, Alleles and Disease Models Mouse data from MGI

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Allele Composition & genetic background Accession Phenotype Id Phenotype Reference
Ccr5tm1Kuz Ccr5tm1Kuz/Ccr5tm1Kuz
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
MGI:107182  MP:0002432 abnormal CD4-positive T cell morphology PMID: 10843684 
Ccr5tm1Kuz Ccr5tm1Kuz/Ccr5tm1Kuz
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
MGI:107182  MP:0005010 abnormal CD8-positive T cell morphology PMID: 10843684 
Ccr5tm1Blck Ccr5tm1Blck/Ccr5tm1Blck
B6.129P2-Ccr5
MGI:107182  MP:0009858 abnormal cellular extravasation PMID: 16275892 
Ccr5tm1Kuz Ccr5tm1Kuz/Ccr5tm1Kuz
B6.129P2-Ccr5
MGI:107182  MP:0002805 abnormal conditioned taste aversion behavior PMID: 16105698 
Ccr5tm1Kuz Ccr5tm1Kuz/Ccr5tm1Kuz
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
MGI:107182  MP:0008713 abnormal cytokine level PMID: 10843684 
Ccr5tm1Brv Ccr5tm1Brv/Ccr5tm1Brv
either: (involves: 129S1/Sv * ICR) or (involves: 129S1/Sv * 129X1/SvJ * ICR)
MGI:107182  MP:0003009 abnormal cytokine secretion PMID: 9558111 
Ccr5tm1Blck Ccr5tm1Blck/Ccr5tm1Blck
B6.129P2-Ccr5
MGI:107182  MP:0003628 abnormal leukocyte adhesion PMID: 16275892 
Ccr5tm1Sush Ccr5tm1Sush/Ccr5tm1Sush
B6.129P2-Ccr5
MGI:107182  MP:0002442 abnormal leukocyte physiology PMID: 12524535 
Ccr5tm1Kuz Ccr5tm1Kuz/Ccr5tm1Kuz
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
MGI:107182  MP:0001392 abnormal locomotor activity PMID: 10843684 
Ccr5tm1Blck Ccr5tm1Blck/Ccr5tm1Blck
B6.129P2-Ccr5
MGI:107182  MP:0000343 altered response to myocardial infarction PMID: 16275892 
Ccr5tm1Brv Ccr5tm1Brv/Ccr5tm1Brv
either: (involves: 129S1/Sv * ICR) or (involves: 129S1/Sv * 129X1/SvJ * ICR)
MGI:107182  MP:0008658 decreased interleukin-1 beta secretion PMID: 9558111 
Ccr5tm1Brv Ccr5tm1Brv/Ccr5tm1Brv
either: (involves: 129S1/Sv * ICR) or (involves: 129S1/Sv * 129X1/SvJ * ICR)
MGI:107182  MP:0008706 decreased interleukin-6 secretion PMID: 9558111 
Ccr5tm1Brv Ccr5tm1Brv/Ccr5tm1Brv
either: (involves: 129S1/Sv * ICR) or (involves: 129S1/Sv * 129X1/SvJ * ICR)
MGI:107182  MP:0008734 decreased susceptibility to endotoxin shock PMID: 9558111 
Ccr5tm1Kuz Ccr5tm1Kuz/Ccr5tm1Kuz
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
MGI:107182  MP:0008539 decreased susceptibility to induced colitis PMID: 10843684 
Ccr5tm1Sush Ccr5tm1Sush/Ccr5tm1Sush
B6.129P2-Ccr5
MGI:107182  MP:0005095 decreased T cell proliferation PMID: 12524535 
Ccr5tm1Kuz Ccr5tm1Kuz/Ccr5tm1Kuz
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
MGI:107182  MP:0005496 impaired macrophage recruitment PMID: 10528159  12618265 
Ccr5tm1Kuz Ccr5tm1Kuz/Ccr5tm1Kuz
B6.129P2-Ccr5
MGI:107182  MP:0003545 increased alcohol consumption PMID: 16105698 
Ccr5tm1Kuz Ccr5tm1Kuz/Ccr5tm1Kuz
B6.129P2-Ccr5
MGI:107182  MP:0003911 increased drinking behavior PMID: 16105698 
Ccr5tm1Brv Ccr5tm1Brv/Ccr5tm1Brv
either: (involves: 129S1/Sv * ICR) or (involves: 129S1/Sv * 129X1/SvJ * ICR)
MGI:107182  MP:0008499 increased IgG1 level PMID: 9558111 
Ccr5tm1Brv Ccr5tm1Brv/Ccr5tm1Brv
either: (involves: 129S1/Sv * ICR) or (involves: 129S1/Sv * 129X1/SvJ * ICR)
MGI:107182  MP:0008566 increased interferon-gamma secretion PMID: 9558111 
Ccr5tm1Brv Ccr5tm1Brv/Ccr5tm1Brv
either: (involves: 129S1/Sv * ICR) or (involves: 129S1/Sv * 129X1/SvJ * ICR)
MGI:107182  MP:0008699 increased interleukin-4 secretion PMID: 9558111 
Ccr5tm1Blck Ccr5tm1Blck/Ccr5tm1Blck
B6.129P2-Ccr5
MGI:107182  MP:0004751 increased length of allograft survival PMID: 15307189 
Ccr5tm1Kuz Ccr5tm1Kuz/Ccr5tm1Kuz
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
MGI:107182  MP:0008039 increased NK T cell number PMID: 10843684 
Ccr5tm1Brv Ccr5tm1Brv/Ccr5tm1Brv
either: (involves: 129S1/Sv * ICR) or (involves: 129S1/Sv * 129X1/SvJ * ICR)
MGI:107182  MP:0002412 increased susceptibility to bacterial infection PMID: 9558111 
Ccr5tm1Kuz Ccr5tm1Kuz/Ccr5tm1Kuz
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
MGI:107182  MP:0005399 increased susceptibility to fungal infection PMID: 10528159 
Ccr5tm1Brv Ccr5tm1Brv/Ccr5tm1Brv
either: (involves: 129S1/Sv * ICR) or (involves: 129S1/Sv * 129X1/SvJ * ICR)
MGI:107182  MP:0005617 increased susceptibility to type IV hypersensitivity reaction PMID: 9558111 
Clinically-Relevant Mutations and Pathophysiology
Disease:  Diabetes mellitus, insulin-dependent, 22
OMIM:  612522
References: 
Mutations not determined
Disease:  West nile virus, susceptibility to
OMIM:  610379
References: 
Mutations not determined
Disease:  Human immunodeficiency virus type 1, susceptibility to
OMIM:  609423
References: 
Mutations not determined
Biologically Significant Variants
Type:  Naturally occurring mutation.
Species:  Human
Description:  A 32 bp deletion in the CCR5 gene gives rise to the CCR5Δ32 receptor variant. Individuals homozygous for the CCR5Δ32 allele are highly resistant to HIV-1 infection and heterozygotes have delayed AIDS progression.
References:  14,42,47
Type:  Naturally occurring mutation.
Species:  Human
Description:  The CCR5Δ32 receptor variant identified in Dutch Caucasian women is thought to be linked to a lower incidence of tubal pathology following Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection.
References:  12
Type:  Naturally occurring mutation.
Species:  Human
Description:  The CCR5Δ32 variant may be linked to an increased age of multiple sclerosis (MS) onset but a higher mortality rate among MS sufferers.
References:  11,22
Type:  Naturally occurring mutation.
Species:  Human
Description:  The CCR5Δ32 variant may be associated with an increased risk of the development of sarcoidosis.
References:  50
Type:  Naturally occurring mutation.
Species:  Human
Description:  The CCR5Δ32 variant may contribute to the control of the chronic inflammation state present in sickle cell disease sufferers.
References:  17,61
Type:  Naturally occurring mutation.
Species:  Human
Description:  The CCR5Δ32 variant may be linked to an increased risk of symptomatic West Nile virus (WNV) infection.
References:  25
Type:  Single nucleotide polymorphism.
Species:  Human
Description:  Gene promotor polymorphisms have been associated with risk of HIV disease progression.
References:  40
Available Assays
DiscoveRx PathHunter® CHO-K1 CCR5 β-Arrestin Cell Line (Cat no. 93-0224C2)
PathHunter® eXpress CCR5 CHO-K1 β-Arrestin GPCR Assay (Cat no. 93-0224E2CP0M)
more info

REFERENCES

1. Ajuebor MN, Aspinall AI, Zhou F, Le T, Yang Y, Urbanski SJ, Sidobre S, Kronenberg M, Hogaboam CM, Swain MG. (2005) Lack of chemokine receptor CCR5 promotes murine fulminant liver failure by preventing the apoptosis of activated CD1d-restricted NKT cells. J Immunol174: 8027-8037. [PMID:15944310]

2. Albright AV, Shieh JT, Itoh T, Lee B, Pleasure D, O'Connor MJ, Doms RW, González-Scarano F. (1999) Microglia express CCR5, CXCR4, and CCR3, but of these, CCR5 is the principal coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 dementia isolates. J Virol73: 205-213. [PMID:9847323]

3. Algood HM, Flynn JL. (2004) CCR5-deficient mice control Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection despite increased pulmonary lymphocytic infiltration. J Immunol173: 3287-3296. [PMID:15322191]

4. Ambati BK, Anand A, Joussen AM, Kuziel WA, Adamis AP, Ambati J. (2003) Sustained inhibition of corneal neovascularization by genetic ablation of CCR5. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci44: 590-593. [PMID:12556387]

5. Andres PG, Beck PL, Mizoguchi E, Mizoguchi A, Bhan AK, Dawson T, Kuziel WA, Maeda N, MacDermott RP, Podolsky DK, Reinecker HC. (2000) Mice with a selective deletion of the CC chemokine receptors 5 or 2 are protected from dextran sodium sulfate-mediated colitis: lack of CC chemokine receptor 5 expression results in a NK1.1+ lymphocyte-associated Th2-type immune response in the intestine. J Immunol164: 6303-6312. [PMID:10843684]

6. Aramori I, Ferguson SS, Bieniasz PD, Zhang J, Cullen B, Cullen MG. (1997) Molecular mechanism of desensitization of the chemokine receptor CCR-5: receptor signaling and internalization are dissociable from its role as an HIV-1 co-receptor. EMBO J16: 4606-4616. [PMID:9303305]

7. Ayehunie S, Garcia-Zepeda EA, Hoxie JA, Horuk R, Kupper TS, Luster AD, Ruprecht RM. (1997) Human immunodeficiency virus-1 entry into purified blood dendritic cells through CC and CXC chemokine coreceptors. Blood90: 1379-1386. [PMID:9269754]

8. Baba M, Nishimura O, Kanzaki N, Okamoto M, Sawada H, Iizawa Y, Shiraishi M, Aramaki Y, Okonogi K, Ogawa Y, Meguro K, Fujino M. (1999) A small-molecule, nonpeptide CCR5 antagonist with highly potent and selective anti-HIV-1 activity. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.96: 5698-5703. [PMID:10318947]

9. Baba M, Takashima K, Miyake H, Kanzaki N, Teshima K, Wang X, Shiraishi M, Iizawa Y. (2005) TAK-652 inhibits CCR5-mediated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in vitro and has favorable pharmacokinetics in humans. Antimicrob Agents Chemother49: 4584-4591. [PMID:16251299]

10. Bao L, Zhu Y, Zhu J, Lindgren JU. (2005) Decreased IgG production but increased MIP-1beta expression in collagen-induced arthritis in C-C chemokine receptor 5-deficient mice. Cytokine31: 64-71. [PMID:15967376]

11. Barcellos LF, Schito AM, Rimmler JB, Vittinghoff E, Shih A, Lincoln R, Callier S, Elkins MK, Goodkin DE, Haines JL, Pericak-Vance MA, Hauser SL, Oksenberg JR. (2000) CC-chemokine receptor 5 polymorphism and age of onset in familial multiple sclerosis. Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Group. Immunogenetics51: 281-288. [PMID:10803840]

12. Barr EL, Ouburg S, Igietseme JU, Morré SA, Okwandu E, Eko FO, Ifere G, Belay T, He Q, Lyn D, Nwankwo G, Lillard J, Black CM, Ananaba GA. (2005) Host inflammatory response and development of complications of Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection in CCR5-deficient mice and subfertile women with the CCR5delta32 gene deletion. J Microbiol Immunol Infect38: 244-254. [PMID:16118671]

13. Belnoue E, Kayibanda M, Deschemin JC, Viguier M, Mack M, Kuziel WA, Rénia L. (2003) CCR5 deficiency decreases susceptibility to experimental cerebral malaria. Blood101: 4253-4259. [PMID:12560237]

14. Benkirane M, Jin DY, Chun RF, Koup RA, Jeang KT. (1997) Mechanism of transdominant inhibition of CCR5-mediated HIV-1 infection by ccr5delta32. J Biol Chem272: 30603-30606. [PMID:9388191]

15. Blanpain C, Migeotte I, Lee B, Vakili J, Doranz BJ, Govaerts C, Vassart G, Doms RW, Parmentier M. (1999) CCR5 binds multiple CC-chemokines: MCP-3 acts as a natural antagonist. Blood94: 1899-1905. [PMID:10477718]

16. Cartier L, Dubois-Dauphin M, Hartley O, Irminger-Finger I, Krause KH. (2003) Chemokine-induced cell death in CCR5-expressing neuroblastoma cells. J Neuroimmunol145: 27-39. [PMID:14644028]

17. Chies JA, Hutz MH. (2003) High frequency of the CCR5delta32 variant among individuals from an admixed Brazilian population with sickle cell anemia. Braz J Med Biol Res36: 71-75. [PMID:12532229]

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To cite this database page, please use the following:

Israel F. Charo, Rebecca Hills, Richard Horuk, Kouji Matsushima, Philip M. Murphy, Joost J. Oppenheim.
Chemokine receptors: CCR5. Last modified on 21/03/2014. Accessed on 28/07/2014. IUPHAR database (IUPHAR-DB), http://www.iuphar-db.org/DATABASE/ObjectDisplayForward?objectId=62.

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