Nomenclature: TP receptor

Family: Prostanoid receptors

Annotation status:  image of a green circle Annotated and expert reviewed. Please contact us if you can help with updates. 

Contents

Gene and Protein Information
class A G protein-coupled receptor
Species TM AA Chromosomal Location Gene Symbol Gene Name Reference
Human 7 343 19p13.3 TBXA2R thromboxane A2 receptor 21
Mouse 7 341 10 C1 Tbxa2r thromboxane A2 receptor 9,53,67
Rat 7 341 7q11 Tbxa2r thromboxane A2 receptor 1
Previous and Unofficial Names
thromboxane
thromboxane A2 / prostaglandin H2
TXA2
TXA2-R
TXR2
Thromboxane receptor
prostanoid TP receptor
thromboxane A2 receptor
Tp receptor
TP
Database Links
ChEMBL Target
DrugBank Target
Ensembl Gene
Entrez Gene
GPCRDB
GeneCards
GenitoUrinary Development Molecular Anatomy Project
HomoloGene
Human Protein Reference Database
InterPro
KEGG Gene
OMIM
Orphanet Gene
PharmGKB Gene
PhosphoSitePlus
Protein Ontology (PRO)
RefSeq Nucleotide
RefSeq Protein
TreeFam
UniGene Hs.
UniProtKB
Wikipedia
Natural/Endogenous Ligands
PGD2
PGE2
PGF
PGI2
thromboxane A2
Comments: thromboxane A2 is the principal endogenous agonist
Rank order of potency
thromboxane A2 = PGH2 >> PGD2, PGE2, PGF, PGI2
Agonists
Key to terms and symbols View all chemical structures Click column headers to sort
Ligand Sp. Action Affinity Units Reference
I-BOP Hs Agonist 8.94 – 9.32 pKd 43
pKd 8.94 – 9.32 (Kd 1.16x10-9 – 4.8x10-10 M) [43]
[125I]BOP Hs Full agonist 8.7 pKd 48
pKd 8.7 (Kd 2x10-9 M) [48]
[3H]U46619 Hs Full agonist 7.8 pKd 2
pKd 7.8 [2]
10,10-difluoro TXA2 Hs Full agonist 7.0 pKd 49
pKd 7.0 (Kd 1x10-7 M) [49]
I-BOP Mm Full agonist 9.3 pKi 34
pKi 9.3 [34]
EP 171 Hs Full agonist 8.5 pKi 27
pKi 8.5 [27]
U46609 Hs Full agonist 8.4 pKi 47
pKi 8.4 [47]
STA2 Mm Full agonist 7.9 pKi 34
pKi 7.9 [34]
U46619 Hs Full agonist 7.5 pKi 2
pKi 7.5 [2]
U46619 Mm Full agonist 7.2 pKi 34
pKi 7.2 [34]
M&B 28767 Hs Full agonist 6.5 pKi 2
pKi 6.5 [2]
CTA2 Hs Full agonist 6.5 pKi 47
pKi 6.5 [47]
cloprostenol Hs Full agonist 5.2 pKi 2
pKi 5.2 [2]
iloprost Hs Full agonist 5.2 pKi 2
pKi 5.2 [2]
PGF Hs Full agonist 5.1 pKi 2
pKi 5.1 [2]
carbacyclin Hs Full agonist 4.7 pKi 2
pKi 4.7 [2]
butaprost (free acid form) Hs Full agonist 4.7 pKi 2
pKi 4.7 [2]
PGE2 Hs Full agonist 4.5 pKi 2
pKi 4.5 [2]
fluprostenol Hs Full agonist 4.3 pKi 2
pKi 4.3 [2]
SQ 26655 Rn Full agonist 9.05 pEC50 62
pEC50 9.05 (EC50 9x10-10 M) [62]
AGN 191976 Hs Full agonist 7.8 pEC50 37
pEC50 7.8 (EC50 1.6x10-8 M) [37]
STA2 Hs Agonist 6.38 – 7.06 pIC50 6
pIC50 6.38 – 7.06 (IC50 4.2x10-7 – 8.7x10-8 M) [6]
AGN192093 Hs Agonist - -
View species-specific agonist tables
Agonist Comments
References [27,47-48] use human platelet preparations instead of transfected cells.

PGH2 and TXA2 are only rarely used as TP agonists owing to their instability under physiological conditions; U46619 is an appropriate substitute. Partial agonism is common among close analogues of PGH2 and TXA2.

References given alongside the TP receptor agonists I-BOP [43] and STA2 [6] use human platelets as the source of TP receptors for competition radio-ligand binding assays to determine the indicated activity values.

Care should be taken in handling highly potent TP agonists such as EP-171 and I-BOP as they are expected to be resistant to in vivo deactivation by 15-OH prostaglandin dehydrogenase owing to their 16-p-halophenoxy moieties.
Antagonists
Key to terms and symbols View all chemical structures Click column headers to sort
Ligand Sp. Action Affinity Units Reference
I-SAP Hs Antagonist 9.33 pKd 52
pKd 9.33 (Kd 4.7x10-10 M) [52]
[3H]SQ-29548 Rn Antagonist 9.0 pKd 1
pKd 9.0 [1]
[3H]S-145 Hs Antagonist 8.9 pKd 21
pKd 8.9 [21]
[125I]SAP Hs Antagonist 7.7 – 9.3 pKd 52
pKd 7.7 – 9.3 (Kd 2x10-8 – 5x10-10 M) [52]
[3H]S-145 Mm Antagonist 8.5 pKd 53
pKd 8.5 [53]
[125I]SQ-29548 Hs Antagonist 8.3 pKd 20
pKd 8.3 [20]
[3H]SQ-29548 Hs Antagonist 7.4 – 8.2 pKd 2,78
pKd 7.4 – 8.2 (Kd 4x10-8 – 6.3x10-9 M) [2,78]
[125I]PTA-OH Hs Antagonist 7.7 pKd 18
pKd 7.7 [18]
domitroban Hs Antagonist 9.6 pKi 35
pKi 9.6 [35]
ifetroban Hs Antagonist 8.4 – 10.0 pKi 56
pKi 8.4 – 10.0 [56]
domitroban Mm Antagonist 9.2 pKi 34
pKi 9.2 [34]
KW-3635 Hs Antagonist 8.9 pKi 47
pKi 8.9 [47]
vapiprost Hs Antagonist 8.3 – 9.4 pKi 6,39
pKi 8.3 – 9.4 [6,39]
SQ-29548 Hs Antagonist 8.1 – 9.1 pKi 2,64,78
pKi 8.1 – 9.1 [2,64,78]
ONO-3708 Hs Antagonist 7.4 – 8.9 pKi 31
pKi 7.4 – 8.9 [31]
ramatroban Hs Antagonist 8.0 pKi 68
pKi 8.0 [68]
SQ-29548 Mm Antagonist 7.9 pKi 34
pKi 7.9 [34]
vapiprost Mm Antagonist 7.9 pKi 34
pKi 7.9 [34]
daltroban Hs Antagonist 7.7 pKi 47
pKi 7.7 [47]
S-5751 Hs Antagonist 7.6 pKi 5
pKi 7.6 [5]
ONO-8711 Hs Antagonist 7.1 pKi 77
pKi 7.1 [77]
AH23848 Hs Antagonist 6.2 pKi 2
pKi 6.2 [2]
ICI 192605 Hs Antagonist 7.19 pIC50 60
pIC50 7.19 (IC50 6.5x10-8 M) [60]
terutroban Hs Antagonist 6.49 pIC50 11
pIC50 6.49 (IC50 3.2x10-7 M) [11]
View species-specific antagonist tables
Antagonist Comments
References [6,20,31,35,47,52,56,68] use human platelet preparations instead of transfected cells.

A wide range of structurally diverse TP antagonists are known; GR-32191 and SQ-29548 are in common use. Agents combining TP antagonism and IP agonism [7,19,44] and TP antagonism and TX synthase inhibition [73] are known.
Primary Transduction Mechanisms
Transducer Effector/Response
Gq/G11 family Phospholipase C stimulation
References:  33
Tissue Distribution
Endothelium.
Species:  Human
Technique:  Northern blotting.
References:  57
Placenta > lung.
Species:  Human
Technique:  Northern blotting.
References:  21
Brain, thymus, small intestine.
Species:  Human
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  45
Prostatic cancer cells.
Species:  Human
Technique:  Radioligand binding.
References:  54
Platelets.
Species:  Human
Technique:  Radioligand binding.
References:  41
Uterus.
Species:  Human
Technique:  Immunohistochemistry, immunocytochemistry, Northern blotting, in situ hybridisation, radioligand binding.
References:  63
Thymus, spleen, lung.
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  Northern blotting.
References:  53
Fetal: thymus, kidney.
Adult: thymus (cortex), spleen (red pulp).
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  in situ hybridisation.
References:  9
CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the spleen.
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  28
Thymus, lung, kidney, T cell line (EL-4).
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  RNase protection assay.
References:  9
Thymocytes.
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  Radioligand binding.
References:  71
Dorsal root ganglion neurons and keratinocytes.
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  Immunohistochemistry and Ca2+ response.
References:  4
Kidney: glomeruli, arterial walls, luminal membranes of thick ascending limbs of Henle's loop, luminal and basolateral membranes of either distal convoluted tubules or connecting tubules, the basolateral membranes of collecting tubules.
Species:  Rat
Technique:  Western blotting.
References:  65
Platelets.
Species:  Rat
Technique:  Radioligand binding.
References:  41
Hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells.
Species:  Rat
Technique:  Radioligand binding.
References:  25
Nodosa ganglion neurons.
Species:  Rabbit
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  74
Expression Datasets

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Log average relative transcript abundance in mouse tissues measured by qPCR from Regard, J.B., Sato, I.T., and Coughlin, S.R. (2008). Anatomical profiling of G protein-coupled receptor expression. Cell, 135(3): 561-71. [PMID:18984166] [Raw data: website]

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Functional Assays
Measurement of Ca2+ levels in HEK 293 cells transfected with the human TP receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  HEK 293 cells.
Response measured:  Increase in Ca2+ concentration.
References:  33,76
Measurement of Ca2+ in human platelets endogenously expressing the TP receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  Platelets.
Response measured:  Increase in Ca2+ concentration.
References:  33,76
Measurement of Ca2+ levels, using a Ca2+-activated Cl- channel, in Xenopus oocytes transfected with the human TP receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  Xenopus oocytes.
Response measured:  Increase in Ca2+ concentration.
References:  21
Measurement of ERK and JNK activity in HEK 293 cells transfected with the human TP receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  HEK 293 cells.
Response measured:  Activation of ERK signalling cascade.
References:  46
Measurement of ERK and JNK activity in human uterine ULTR cell line endogenously expressing the TP receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  Uterine ULTR cell line.
Response measured:  Activation of ERK signalling cascade.
References:  46
Measurement of Ca2+ levels in COS-7 cells transfected with the rat TP receptor.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  COS-7 cells.
Response measured:  Increase in free Ca2+ concentration.
References:  1
Measurement of Ca2+ levels in Xenopus oocytes transfected with the rat TP receptor using electrophysiology.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  Xenopus oocytes.
Response measured:  Increase in Ca2+ concentration.
References:  1
Physiological Functions
Contraction of pulmonary venous smooth muscle.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  Pulmonary venous preparations.
References:  55,75
Contraction of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  Pulmonary vascular preparations.
References:  55
Contraction of bronchial smooth muscle.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  Bronchial smooth muscle preparations.
References:  12
Bronchoconstriction.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  26
Vasoconstriction.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  72
Platelet aggregation.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  17
Platelet aggregation.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  Platelets.
References:  40
Mediation of cellular immune responses and inflammatory tissue injury.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  70
TP mediates U46619-induced airway constriction through an M3 muscarinic acetycholine receptor-dependent mechanism.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Lung.
References:  3
A TP agonist U46619 induces itch in mice, which is inhibited by a TP antagonist ONO-3708 and is absent in TP knoout mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Skin.
References:  4
Suppression of lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury by a TP antagonist, S-145.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  Liver.
References:  25
Suppression of lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury by a TP antagonist, S-145.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Liver.
References:  71
The TP agonist I-BOP induces expression of MCP-1/CCL2 in lung cancer cell lines through activation of SP-1.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  Lung cancer cells.
References:  38
Physiological Consequences of Altering Gene Expression
TP receptor knockout mice exhibit an increase in bleeding time and impaired platelet aggregation in response to TP receptor agonists.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  69
Spleen cells from TP receptor knockout mice exhibit reduced cellular immune responsiveness and TP receptor knockout mice exhibit reduced immune-mediated tissue injury following cardiac transplant rejection in vivo.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  70
TP receptor knockout mice exhibit enhanced immune responses and the development of lymphadenopathy.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  28
TP receptor knockout mice exhibit inhibition of cytokine-induced increase in beating rate, as seen in wild-type mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  66
TP knockout mice display delayed atherogenesis and impaired inflammatory tachycarcia.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  36,66
TP receptor knockout mice enhibit altered renal vascular tone.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  59
TP knockout mice show a reduction in B16F1 lung colonization and mortality rate in a lung metastasis model of B16H1 melanoma cells.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Lung/melanoma cells.
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  42
TP knockout mice exhibit attenuated microcirculatory dysfunction as examined by leukocyte adhesion to sinusoid, non-perfused sinusoids and release of ALT in the liver in response to TNF-α.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Hepatic microcirculation.
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  30
TP knockout mice exhibit attenuated hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy, but enhanced kidney hypertrophy, glomerulosclerosis, tubule vacuolization, and interstitial chronic inflammation, in response to L-NAME.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  in vivo
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  15
TP knockout mice exhibit enhanced susceptibility to Trypanosoma cruzi infection.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  in vivo
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  8
TP knockout mice exhibit attenuation of cardiac hypertrophy and prevention of cardiac fibrosis but do not affect hypertension induced by IP deficiency in response to high salt.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  14
Mice deficient in TP selectively in neurons do not exhibit U-46619-induced bronchoconstriction after OVA-induced allergic inflamamtion in the lung.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  smooth muscel-TP deficient (Tbxa2rF/− Tgln-cre) mice and neural TP-deficeint (Tbxa2rF/−Nestin-cre) mice.
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  13
TP knockout mice showed reduced apoptosis of thymocytes in response to systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Thymus, CD4+CD8+ double positive thymocytes.
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  58
TP knockout mice exhibit attenuated vascular remodeling to catheter-induced injury and cancel out enhanced response by IP deficiency.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Carotid artery.
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  10
Mice deficient in TP selectively in smooth muscle exhibit enhanced hypertension and aortic remodeling in response to angiotensin II infusion.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  TP knockout in smooth muscle cells (KISM22α-Cre+Tpflox/flox ).
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  61
Phenotypes, Alleles and Disease Models Mouse data from MGI

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Allele Composition & genetic background Accession Phenotype Id Phenotype Reference
Tbxa2rtm1Cof Tbxa2rtm1Cof/Tbxa2rtm1Cof
C.129P2(B6)-Tbxa2r
MGI:98496  MP:0000249 abnormal blood vessel physiology PMID: 11964481 
Tbxa2rtm1Cof Tbxa2rtm1Cof/Tbxa2rtm1Cof
either: (involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6 * DBA/2) or (involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * 129S/SvEv)
MGI:98496  MP:0001544 abnormal cardiovascular system physiology PMID: 9835625 
Tbxa2rtm1Sna Tbxa2rtm1Sna/Tbxa2rtm1Sna
either: (involves: 129/Ola * BALB/c) or (involves: 129/Ola * C57BL/6)
MGI:98496  MP:0002351 abnormal cervical lymph node morphology PMID: 12778172 
Tbxa2rtm1Sna Tbxa2rtm1Sna/Tbxa2rtm1Sna
either: (involves: 129/Ola * BALB/c) or (involves: 129/Ola * C57BL/6)
MGI:98496  MP:0002723 abnormal immune serum protein physiology PMID: 12778172 
Tbxa2rtm1Sna Tbxa2rtm1Sna/Tbxa2rtm1Sna
either: (involves: 129/Ola * BALB/c) or (involves: 129/Ola * C57BL/6)
MGI:98496  MP:0002722 abnormal immune system organ morphology PMID: 12778172 
Tbxa2rtm1Sna Tbxa2rtm1Sna/Tbxa2rtm1Sna
either: (involves: 129/Ola * BALB/c) or (involves: 129/Ola * C57BL/6)
MGI:98496  MP:0001790 abnormal immune system physiology PMID: 12778172 
Tbxa2rtm1Sna Tbxa2rtm1Sna/Tbxa2rtm1Sna
either: (involves: 129/Ola * BALB/c) or (involves: 129/Ola * C57BL/6)
MGI:98496  MP:0002339 abnormal lymph node morphology PMID: 12778172 
Tbxa2rtm1Cof Tbxa2rtm1Cof/Tbxa2rtm1Cof
either: (involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6 * DBA/2) or (involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * 129S/SvEv)
MGI:98496  MP:0009548 abnormal platelet aggregation PMID: 9835625 
Tbxa2rtm1Cof Tbxa2rtm1Cof/Tbxa2rtm1Cof
C.129P2(B6)-Tbxa2r
MGI:98496  MP:0005464 abnormal platelet physiology PMID: 11964481 
Tbxa2rtm1Cof Tbxa2rtm1Cof/Tbxa2rtm1Cof
C.129P2(B6)-Tbxa2r
MGI:98496  MP:0009818 abnormal thromboxane level PMID: 11964481 
Tbxa2rtm1Sna Tbxa2rtm1Sna/Tbxa2rtm1Sna
either: (involves: 129/Ola * BALB/c) or (involves: 129/Ola * C57BL/6)
MGI:98496  MP:0002531 abnormal type I hypersensitivity reaction PMID: 12778172 
Tbxa2rtm1Sna Tbxa2rtm1Sna/Tbxa2rtm1Sna
either: (involves: 129/Ola * BALB/c) or (involves: 129/Ola * C57BL/6)
MGI:98496  MP:0000702 enlarged lymph nodes PMID: 12778172 
Tbxa2rtm1Sna Tbxa2rtm1Sna/Tbxa2rtm1Sna
either: (involves: 129/Ola * BALB/c) or (involves: 129/Ola * C57BL/6)
MGI:98496  MP:0000691 enlarged spleen PMID: 12778172 
Tbxa2rtm1Cof Tbxa2rtm1Cof/Tbxa2rtm1Cof
either: (involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6 * DBA/2) or (involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * 129S/SvEv)
MGI:98496  MP:0005606 increased bleeding time PMID: 9835625 
Clinically-Relevant Mutations and Pathophysiology
Disease:  Bleeding disorder, platelet-type, 13, susceptibility to
OMIM:  614009
Orphanet:  220443
References: 
Mutations not determined
Biologically Significant Variants
Type:  Missense mutation
Species:  Human
Description:  Mutation leads to loss of receptor binding in a patient with a bleeding diathesis.
Change:  D304N
Amino acids:  304
References:  50
Type:  Single nucleotide polymorphism.
Species:  Human
Description:  TP SNPs and susceptibility to cerebral infarction.
References:  29
Type:  Missense mutation
Species:  Human
Description:  Platelet dysfunction, reduced response to TP agonist and reduced affinity to TP radioligand associated with the Trp29Cys TP receptor variant.
Change:  W29C
Amino acids:  29
References:  51
Type:  Splice variants.
Species:  Human
Description:  Two splice variants of the TP receptor have been found in humans, TPα and TPβ, containing an identical 328 amino acid sequence but differing in their 15 amino acid and 79 amino acid, respectively, C-terminal regions. They have identical ligand and G protein binding properties, similarly regulate PLC, but they are differentially expressed throughout the body and oppositely regulate adeylate cyclase activity.
References:  23,32-33,57,76
Type:  Single nucleotide polymorphism.
Species:  Human
Description:  An Arg60 -> Leu substitution has been identified in patients suffering from a dominantly inherited bleeding disorder. This mutant receptor displays normal ligand binding but defective signal transduction when expressed in CHO cells.
References:  22
General Comments
Further reading:
Heterodimerization with the IP receptor [24].
Heterodimerization of TP-α and -β isoforms [79].
Transcriptional regulation and promoter analysis of TP [16].
Available Assays
DiscoveRx PathHunter® eXpress TBXA2R U2OS β-Arrestin GPCR Assay (Cat no. 93-0322E3CP5M)
PathHunter® U2OS TBXA2R β-Arrestin Cell Line (Cat no. 93-0322C3)
more info

REFERENCES

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2. Abramovitz M, Adam M, Boie Y, Carriere M, Denis D, Godbout C, Lamontagne S, Rochette C, Sawyer N, Tremblay NM, Belley M, Gallant M, Dufresne C, Gareau Y, Ruel R, Juteau H, Labelle M, Ouimet N, Metters KM. (2000) The utilization of recombinant prostanoid receptors to determine the affinities and selectivities of prostaglandins and related analogues. Biochim. Biophys. Acta.1483: 285-293. [PMID:10634944]

3. Allen IC, Hartney JM, Coffman TM, Penn RB, Wess J, Koller BH. (2006) Thromboxane A2 induces airway constriction through an M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent mechanism. Am. J. Physiol. Lung Cell Mol. Physiol.290 (3): L526-33. [PMID:16243899]

4. Andoh T, Nishikawa Y, Yamaguchi-Miyamoto T, Nojima H, Narumiya S, Kuraishi Y. (2007) Thromboxane A2 induces itch-associated responses through TP receptors in the skin in mice. J. Invest. Dermatol.127 (8): 2042-7. [PMID:17429442]

5. Arimura A, Yasui K, Kishino J, Asanuma F, Hasegawa H, Kakudo S, Ohtani M, Arita H. (2001) Prevention of allergic inflammation by a novel prostaglandin receptor antagonist, S-5751. J Pharmacol Exp Ther298: 411-419. [PMID:11454901]

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7. Armstrong RA, Jones RL, MacDermot J, Wilson NH. (1986) Prostaglandin endoperoxide analogues which are both thromboxane receptor antagonists and prostacyclin mimetics. Br J Pharmacol87: 543-551. [PMID:3026540]

8. Ashton AW, Mukherjee S, Nagajyothi FN, Huang H, Braunstein VL, Desruisseaux MS, Factor SM, Lopez L, Berman JW, Wittner M et al.. (2007) Thromboxane A2 is a key regulator of pathogenesis during Trypanosoma cruzi infection. J. Exp. Med.204 (4): 929-40. [PMID:17420269]

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10. Cheng Y, Austin SC, Rocca B, Koller BH, Coffman TM, Grosser T, Lawson JA, FitzGerald GA. (2002) Role of prostacyclin in the cardiovascular response to thromboxane A2. Science296: 539-541. [PMID:11964481]

11. Cimetière B, Dubuffet T, Muller O, Descombes JJ, Simonet S, Laubie M, Verbeuren TJ, Lavielle G. (1998) Synthesis and biological evaluation of new tetrahydronaphthalene derivatives as thromboxane receptor antagonists. Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.8 (11): 1375-80. [PMID:9871769]

12. Coleman RA, Sheldrick RL. (1989) Prostanoid-induced contraction of human bronchial smooth muscle is mediated by TP-receptors. Br J Pharmacol96: 688-692. [PMID:2720298]

13. Cyphert JM, Allen IC, Church RJ, Latour AM, Snouwaert JN, Coffman TM, Koller BH. (2012) Allergic inflammation induces a persistent mechanistic switch in thromboxane-mediated airway constriction in the mouse. Am. J. Physiol. Lung Cell Mol. Physiol.302 (1): L140-51. [PMID:21984570]

14. Francois H, Athirakul K, Howell D, Dash R, Mao L, Kim HS, Rockman HA, Fitzgerald GA, Koller BH, Coffman TM. (2005) Prostacyclin protects against elevated blood pressure and cardiac fibrosis. Cell Metab.2 (3): 201-7. [PMID:16154102]

15. Francois H, Makhanova N, Ruiz P, Ellison J, Mao L, Rockman HA, Coffman TM. (2008) A role for the thromboxane receptor in L-NAME hypertension. Am. J. Physiol. Renal Physiol.295 (4): F1096-102. [PMID:18684890]

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To cite this database page, please use the following:

Shuh Narumiya, Robert L. Jones, Mark Giembycz, Xavier Norel, David F. Woodward, Robert A. Coleman, Mark Abramovitz, Richard M. Breyer, Rebecca Hills.
Prostanoid receptors: TP receptor. Last modified on 17/03/2014. Accessed on 26/07/2014. IUPHAR database (IUPHAR-DB), http://www.iuphar-db.org/DATABASE/ObjectDisplayForward?objectId=346.

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